Challenging Habitat
The atmosphere - ocean interface, where gas exchange takes place to establish and maintain equilibrium. (c) C Braungardt 2022

…nothing such as a free lunch…

For many decades, we’ve released too much carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and for some decades, scientists have developed and tested geoengineering solutions for the consequences of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in our… Read More

Biodiversity – COP15

the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) state that around 50,000 wild species are used by humans through hunting, fishing, gathering, logging and harvesting, as well as observing. Around 20% of humanity rely on wild species for income and… Read More

Head in the Clouds!

We are celebrating the 250th birthday of Luke Howard, the man who named the clouds. Besides studying languages, pharmacy and natural sciences, he was an ‘amateur’ meteorologist. The Royal Meteorological Society is marking his contribution to the field… Read More

A giant deep-sea isopod, Bathynomus giganteus, with an antipatharian whip coral, Stichopathes sp., in the foreground, seen during the Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition. While the isopod imaged here was spotted during exploration of a site dubbed “Okeanos Ridge,” Image courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Gulf of Mexico 2017. "Giant Isopod" by NOAA Ocean Exploration & Research is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.

STEAM Education Link VIII

The National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK, has a great outreach programme that includes a series of podcasts called Into the Blue.

Samples of bryozoan colonies on kelp under the microscope. (c) C Braungardt

Citizen Science along Sail Training

Coastal cruises provide many opportunities for undertaking citizen science projects that contribute valuable data to conservation organisations, such as the Marine Conservation Society and the Sea Watch Foundation.

Ice fall at glacier front

STEAM Education Link II

Today’s STEAM link relates to an all-too-familiar phrase in the context of climate change: “…faster than…”

Antarctic Quest 21 Expedition Team on a break

Carbon Footprint for Antarctic Expedition Revisited

I have concluded the carbon footprint estimation for the Antarctic Quest 21 expedition and am happy to announce that the second stage of offsetting a total of 50 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent has also been completed. Download… Read More

Key ring featuring stainless steel tag reading "We are one crew. This is our watch." and sling made from inshore lifeboat material cut-off.

This is Our Watch

A couple of days ago I had the privilege to be hosted by the RNLI in Newlyn, Cornwall, for a visit at the new and the old Penlee Lifeboat stations. We were shown around their Severn Class all… Read More

blue sky with aircraft 'vapour' trails

World Environment Day

From the ending single use plastic to agriculture, technology, education and city planning, Earth Overshoot Day presents climate change solutions with the Power of Possibility on the occasion of World Environment Day 2022.

Reducing my online carbon footprint

It is one thing to be aware of the carbon emissions of online activities (running a website, internet searches, emails, social media, video/music streaming), yet quite another knowing how to reduce it.

Royal Meteorological Society

When the Royal Meteorological Society invited me to write a guest blog about the Antarctic Quest 21 expedition for their MetMatters page, I analysed the daily SitReps provided daily from the Antarctic Peninsula by expedition leader Paul Hart… Read More

Snow accumulation pole at basecamp, Portal Point, installed on 15 Dec 2021. (c) Antarctic Quest 21.

Expedition: Done ✓ The Science has only just started …

In his concluding situation report, Paul leaves it to others to judge whether Antarctic Quest 21 was a successful expedition. I’ll try to provide him with an answer for his Priority 3: Science