Challenging Habitat

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Challenging Habitat has committed to 1% For The Planet.

1% For The Planet is a community advocating action for a better, sustainable future.

Naturally, that includes resources related to COP26, that all-important climate event coming up in November. Let’s work together to effect real change through action, not just words…

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…Sir Ernest Shackleton set sail from Plymouth aboard Quest for the Shackleton-Rowett  Antarctic expedition with a strong scientific mission.

The event is marked today by the Devon-Cornwall Polar Society with an all-day event in Plymouth, which is covered by ITV Westcountry News and the BBC.

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My article in ECO Magazine, featured in the special series on the UN Ocean Decade, tells the story how ocean and citizen science was introduced into sail training on the tall ship Pelican of London.

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Introducing resilience education into the curriculum of an undergraduate degree course at a higher education institution in the UK is a challenge for a scientist with expertise in geochemistry, and it can be a lonely obstacle course.

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AQ21 Scientists – Andrew Smedley

The work of the scientists, who will benefit from the Antarctic Quest 21 expedition is intricate, complex, interdisciplinary and connected to many environmental issues that matter to all of us. Here I’ll try to bring closer to you the work of Andrew Smedley.

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We all know that life is full of uncertainty and most of the time, we don’t notice it too much, let alone worry about it. We’re used to it.

Yet for me, the covid pandemic has, once again, brought into sharp focus how stifling uncertainty is when it comes to planning and taking rational decisions.

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During the covid pandemic lockdown in August/September 2020, the sail training charity Seas Your Future and Darwin200.com achieved something remarkable: to organise a circumnavigation of the British Isles in the tall ship Pelican of London.

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I am in the business of inspiring young people to be curious and ask questions, to get into nature and experience the small and big wonders of it, to make sense of how the planet works and how we interact with it, to seek and find solutions for the mess we’ve made of it, and to feel empowered. In short: I teach environmental science together with colleagues of diverse expertise at the University of Plymouth, and we like to think that we are making an important difference, however small.

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